Perdido 03

Perdido 03

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

Cuomo Wants Tests To Count For 50% Of A Teacher's Evaluation

Well, here's a surprise:

On evaluations, Cuomo wants to see the current formula — 20 percent based on state testing, 20 percent on a local standard, and 60 percent based on qualitative measures such as classroom observation — swapped out for a system that gives equal measure to state testing (or, in certain cases, some other standard that measures work over an academic year) and 50 percent based on at least two observations performed by an administrator, an independent evaluator or an appointed faculty member at a SUNY or CUNY school of education. 
While teachers can now attain tenure after three years, Cuomo would push that to five years and require them to maintain ratings of “effective” or “highly effective.”
On teacher removal, Cuomo would reform the “3020-A” hearing process by creating a presumption in favor of administrators in cases of educational incompetence, and an expedited 60-day process for teachers accused of physical or sexual abuse of a child.

Hadn't heard that he wants to make it 50% tied to test scores.

But that sounds like what he wants there by pushing "a system that gives equal measure to state testing (or, in certain cases, some other standard that measures work over an academic year) and 50 percent based on at least two observations performed by an administrator, an independent evaluator or an appointed faculty member at a SUNY or CUNY school of education."

Anybody have another reading of that?

It sounds to me like those Common Core tests that don't count for students will count for 50% of your APPR rating next year - if Cuomo gets his way.

More later.

14 comments:

  1. From the post..


    Vowing to be the students’ champion, Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Wednesday proposed sweeping education reforms that would impose stricter teacher evaluations, extend the period to earn tenure, expand charter schools and boost state oversight of failing public schools.
    Half of a teacher’s rating should be tied to how their students perform on state standardized exams, up from the current 20 percent, Cuomo said in his State of the State Address.
    Classroom observations by school officials and an independent educator would account for the other 50 percent.
    The Cuomo plan also seeks to prevent school districts from inflating the scores of teachers. Any instructor who is rated ineffective based on student test scores or observations would be barred from receiving an overall rating of effective.
    The governor also recommended that teachers not be awarded tenure until they got five years of effective ratings, up from three years.
    Cuomo also called for an increase in the number of charter schools allowed statewide to 560 from 460.
    His proposal would eliminate “artificial” regional caps that restrict the number of charters that can open in New York City.
    An education tax credit would give New Yorkers a tax break for donating funds to public schools or scholarship funds that aid students in parochial schools. The plan is a top priority of Cardinal Timothy Dolan.
    The Cuomo education plan, which requires legislative approval, also would authorize the state education commissioner to appoint receivers to try to turn around chronically failing public schools — modeled after a Massachusetts program.

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    1. Thanks for this - a good summary of the details.

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  2. Do people really think Cuomo will really wait until next school year to implement the 50% APPR tied to the State assessments? I can see this happening for this school year.

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    1. Yes - APPR stays the same this year. Any changes proposed and made via law in the Legislature or the budget will go into effect next year.

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  3. Good thing this requires "legislative approval". Never gonna happen. He's unpopular, misguided, and disliked by the legislatures. RBE, no way this passes through. At best, Cuomo increases charter schools opening (whatever) and tenure to 5 years (whatever). Two kinda "whoopdee doo" pieces. He can have those two. As for the others, no way we go to 50% on tests tying in to evals. No way common core continues down the road. No way independent administrators are walking into teachers classes for observations. No way. Stop it.

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    1. Much of this will end up in a budget deal in March. Probably not the 50% (more likely 40%, which is what Tisch wanted) and definitely not the independent observers (no $ for that.) But the APPR change, the tenure change, the 3020a change, the cap increase w/ no regional limit - those will all go through UNLESS the unions draw a line in the sand on them.

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  4. The big question: Is he going to try to push these changes through the legislature or through the budget?

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    1. That is the big question. If he includes it in the budget, it will probably go through. Am I right?

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    2. He's tying a funding increase to this agenda. NYSUT ran ads wanting more money , well, they're going to get more money. But only if they agree to his agenda.

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  5. Anno 3:51, I think you are a tad too optimistic. I hope you are correct. However, Cuomo usually gets what he wants.

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    1. Tied to the budget, Cuomo will get much of this. That's been the experience in the first four years, no reason to see it change now. Too bad, since he;s much weakened and this agenda does not address REAL parent concerns about CCSS, testing, class sizes, etc. But the unions cannot fight him on those since they support both CCSS and testing and don't seem to care much about class sizes so long as he grants the leadership a double pension.

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  6. This looks like a...

    Ask for ....................................................this much.
    Get.............................This much.

    The union caves and compromises, then declares it a win, as "it was the best we could do."


    This has been a rinse and repeat union stance since 2001.

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    1. I've been in the system since 2001. That has been my experience. He'll get much of this, though probably not all. He'll increase funds to the system (as he promised to do in the speech.) And the UFT will tell us this scrapes the skies.

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  7. The sad thing is that the any money Cuomo pours into the schools will just be squandered. The NYSUT and the UFT should not be begging for more money. They should be standing up and fighting against all the crap that Cuomo wants to do in his speech today.

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